The One and Only Language of the Ancients

The thickest ice of the planet is not located at the poles as would be expected.

The thickest ice of the planet is not located at the poles as would be expected.

© 2018 B. L. Freeborn

In the last post the idea that ancient art describes the events of a great comet impact and an associated crustal displacement was discussed. It was also suggested that perhaps there is another way to retrieve any existing ancient records of such an event. This leads to a necessary assumption.

NASA image of crater

NASA image of crater

Assuming knowledge of the pole’s movement was known by key individuals, and if they adamantly believed this knowledge must be passed down through an infinite number of generations, then it should be found in the records of numerous cultures. The depiction of key elements in the art of vastly distant cultures, in both time and place, suggests this is true.

The Bible relates that originally one language existed. This has no doubt spurred on the countless researchers over the last 400+ years, since the existence of a base language was first suggested. The Indo-European Language (also known as indogermanisch) is the proposed base language from which a multitude of others evolved. Countless man hours of research has resulted in the mapping out of language development throughout Europe and western Asia. The oldest known is from 4200 BC in the Anatolian region. This is the same area from which Luwian Hieroglyphs originated that have often been referred to in these posts.

Side view of Great Circle in Newark, Ohio.

Side view of Great Circle in Newark, Ohio.

This four century study has also resulted in the mapping of religious areas and trade routes. If one works backwards from this idea, then it is possible to conjecture that the base language was part and parcel to religion, since trade can be done without verbal communication. Which begs the question: what ancient religion was involved?

A good candidate is…………….? Next post

Back to the first post on this topic.

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