The Abc’s of the Indo-European Language

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

We begin with the first three in this post: ea, b, g.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

They represent numbers 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image.

Begin with the first letter that looks like a capital N. As number one it has unique properties. It can create all other whole numbers and one divided by itself is one.

It is suggested it provided the “short a, short e and ea sounds.”

Consider that it suggests the idea: continuous source, beginning.

The second letter ‘b’ has value 2. Numerically it is unique as the first even number. It also has the ability to divide numbers into equal halves. And when two halves of any species come together a new creation is made. Hence, consider that it suggests the idea: in two, to be bisected, to be born, to exist.

The third letter is ‘g’. It is suggested it provides the sound ‘g both hard and soft versions’. As three it is unique in that it is the first digit in pi  = 3.1415 or the ratio between the circumference of a circle and its diameter.

Consider that it suggests the idea: action in a circular manner, rotation, coming together, to gyrate, yaw and in agreement as we see in yes.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

ea = stream, source, aege = awe, eall = all;

bi- = two, be = to be, bu = dwelling;

gay = yaw, ge = yes, ga = to go, ge = an expression of emphasis.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order:

ea-b or aeb = ebb;

b-g or beg = to do, care for, used today in the phrase “that is very big of you”;

Thus far we have three significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, and ‘g’ action, rotation. Each is represented by a short sound.

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Ye Old Language of the Ancients

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” – FDR

All the words in this famous quote by President Roosevelt are Anglo-Saxon and could be understood by people speaking the language a thousand years ago or more.

Note these interesting little riddles made from Anglo-Saxon words. (If the meaning of the word has changed with time, the old meaning is in parentheses.)

Are these not rather descriptive sentences of a comet impact with the planet?

Tap tip top.

Pat put (out eyes) of pate (happy one) into pits and pots.

Mece (sword) and myce (more) make muck of meek.

It came and its cyme (aftermath) is a cumb (valley) and cama (collar).

Pin (torture) pun (poke hole through) into a pan (dish) and pen.

Tack (a nail) take and tuc (punish).

The hale hill was hele (concealed) into a hell.

This book is about the baking, bucking, bickering becca (pike) on the back from where it becks (streams).

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