The Abc’s of the Indo-European Language

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

We begin with the first three in this post: ea, b, g.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

They represent numbers 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image.

Begin with the first letter that looks like a capital N. As number one it has unique properties. It can create all other whole numbers and one divided by itself is one.

It is suggested it provided the “short a, short e and ea sounds.”

Consider that it suggests the idea: continuous source, beginning.

The second letter ‘b’ has value 2. Numerically it is unique as the first even number. It also has the ability to divide numbers into equal halves. And when two halves of any species come together a new creation is made. Hence, consider that it suggests the idea: in two, to be bisected, to be born, to exist.

The third letter is ‘g’. It is suggested it provides the sound ‘g both hard and soft versions’. As three it is unique in that it is the first digit in pi  = 3.1415 or the ratio between the circumference of a circle and its diameter.

Consider that it suggests the idea: action in a circular manner, rotation, coming together, to gyrate, yaw and in agreement as we see in yes.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

ea = stream, source, aege = awe, eall = all;

bi- = two, be = to be, bu = dwelling;

gay = yaw, ge = yes, ga = to go, ge = an expression of emphasis.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order:

ea-b or aeb = ebb;

b-g or beg = to do, care for, used today in the phrase “that is very big of you”;

Thus far we have three significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, and ‘g’ action, rotation. Each is represented by a short sound.

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A Faithful Record of the Indo-European Language

A Bishop of the Catholic Church complete with ancient symbols.

A Bishop of the Catholic Church complete with ancient symbols.

© 2018 B. L. Freeborn

In prior posts the idea that ancient art describes the events of a great comet impact and an associated crustal displacement was discussed. Support from ancient records then turned to the possibility of a pervasive religion that spread ideas and thereby its language. It was suggested this religion was ‘Baalism’ and so the Indo-European Language must be the words used to convey its core ideas… as yet… not identified.

So begins a new search for the actual language, if it still exists. This new search will be divorced from previous well established notions of the Indo-European. In the end, at the very least, a very faithful record of the original Indo-European Language will, hopefully, be revealed.

One must remember that only preserved and translated languages are part of the Indo-European reconstruction developed by academics. Knowledge of languages never written and/or only written on perishable surfaces such as paper seldom survived to be included. Etruscan’s words still linger in limbo. Other languages may have errors in translation. One must assume large pieces of the trail are likely to be missing.

Where to begin?

Let’s start at the opposite end. Instead of at its beginning let’s look at where the language trail ends today. What part of it still strongly exists not diminished much at all by time?

Recall how one first learns to read.

Was step one the A of the alphabet? And then B? The alphabet is very durable. Indeed, we know alphabets tend to be derived from others. The Latin and Hebrew alphabets list letters in a serial order with many letters in the same order. Each letter of Hebrew is also associated with a number. This contributed to a sustained letter order. Today’s Hebrew script and Latin alphabet (used here) developed in a parallel manner from the same source known today as Paleo-Hebrew and Phoenician and in turn they were derived from Proto-Canaanite. (See chart below.)

There are a good many other alphabets all the way back to Luwian (4200 BC) and Sumerian (3500 BC) which have a grid style in common. These alphabets typically are laid out in a table with consonants vs. vowels such as: ca, ci, cu, ce. The Cree and Cherokee Alphabets fall into this style. Interestingly, the Faliscan alphabet (a serial style) from Roman era Italy has two forms of symbol R. One form represents A, a vowel, and another form R, a consonant. The Cherokee (a table style) has two R’s also. One represents E, a vowel, and the other Sv, a consonant. The odds against this must be rather high. Faliscan is derived from Etruscan. The origin of the Cherokee script is documented in Joseph B. Mahan’s “The Secret: America in World History before Columbus.” It is a much more realistic story then the one being passed around the internet. Mahan obtained his information directly from a Shawnee Chief. It confirms that the Cherokee script also has its origins in antiquity.

Development of modern Hebrew from Paleo-Hebrew.

Development of modern Hebrew from Paleo-Hebrew. From oocities.org.

Although pre-dated by the Egyptian scripts, the Proto-Canaanite Alphabet is one of the oldest known. It dates back almost 3500 years. It evolved into Phoenician and eventually into today’s Hebrew. The Hebrew alphabet will serve as the base from which the Indo-European Language will be reconstructed. Another added advantage is the Torah, the original untranslated version of the first five books of the Old Testament, has been meticulously maintained for thousands of years so there is further reason to have confidence in its order and numerical values.

This alphabet will be the starting point for a faithful reproduction of the Indo-European language.

But what can a,b,g,d….. really tell us?

Next post.

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Back to the beginning post on this topic.

A Little Mystery Hidden in the Hebrew Alphabet

– B. L Freeborn, Oct. 2012   (last updated Nov. 2018)

There is a similarity between the Hebrew Alphabet and the Sator-Rotas. A few minutes of time spent looking at the alphabet may help us with the long worn out mystery of the Sator-Rotas.

In 1933, J.P. Frey suggested that Latin speaking Jews were the likely source of the Sator-Rotas Square because of their love of puzzles and because there were Jewish settlements in the area of Pompeii, the location of the oldest known encryption. Duncan Fishwick, MA, University of St. Michael, Toronto discussed this and other ideas in his 1959 article about the Square.

The Sator Rotas has perplexed many noble minds. The more time that passes the more answers are proposed. I am not proposing an answer just yet. That can wait a few more posts. I am only building on Frey’s observation noted above. Duncan’s complete article is available here.

Sator-Rotas from Oppede, Luberon, France. Photo by M. Disdero, Wikipedia.

The Sator-Rotas dates back to 79 AD Pompeii. We look at the Square and note that around a central N is two circles of letters in a square fashion. The inner ring of letters is EPEREPER. The exterior circle creates the name of the puzzle: Sator-Rotas or Rotas-Sator. Now observe the similarity of this puzzle to the Hebrew Alphabet.

Recall that the Latin Alphabet is composed of 52 symbols for 26 sounds. There are two symbols for each sound which are a capital letter and a small letter. Similarly, the Hebrew Alphabet is composed of 27 symbols for 22 sounds. Only five sounds have two symbols but they are not “capitals.” They are used when the sound falls at the end of a word. So we might group this alphabet into two parts.

Those without endcaps:

   and the five pairs with their endcaps:   

The first seventeen letters do not have ‘caps.’ The last ten letters are the pairs for the sounds which equate to k, m, n, p and ts in English.

The first letter that looks like an ‘N’ is the letter ‘Alef’. Because of its similarity to ‘N’ and its central place in the Sator puzzle we will pull it out and make it the center once again. Now we have our central letter “N” or  Alef, the inner circle composed of the ten letters that have endcaps and the outer ring composed of the 16 other letters.

Similarity between Hebrew Alphabet and Sator-Rotas

If the alphabet is also a puzzle then we are left with a clue by understanding that each letter represents a number as well as a sound. The letter ‘Alef’ equals one. The next letter equals 2, and so forth. The sum of all 27 letters in this alphabet is 1775. This letter for a number is what is called the gematria values. From here the puzzle unravels in numbers.  Take note of the following:

The total sum of the alphabet is 1775 and 1775 = pi x 565. Interestingly 1/1775 = .000563.

The central number of the alphabet is 1 and sums to 1.

The outside sixteen letter group of the alphabet sums to 1214.  This is interesting but not significant here. However, it is important that the exterior ring on the Sator Square is also made of 16 letters.

It is of ultimate importance that the ten letters with endcaps sum to 560.  This is nearly the same as 565 seen above.

So, we have an image created by 1 in the center, then 560 and then 1214.

Compare then this next similarity to the Sator puzzle. If “one” is considered to be the center then the EPEREPER inner ring, when converted to numbers using the Hebrew equivalents, becomes:

E = 1

R = 200

P = 80

This gives us the string of numbers: 1, 80, 1, 200, 1, 80, 1, 200 which sums to 564

and plus the central ‘Alef’ or 1 equals 565.

The 560 and 565 of the alphabet reappears in this puzzle as the 564 or 565 of the center of the puzzle.

All those familiar with Hebrew will recognize this pattern, 565, from the letters which spell Yahweh or 5,6,5,10.

Interest piqued? Note this other little mathematical fact about the alphabet. That 1 and 560 appears in other places. Two instances are 10560 and 1056.

In what year was Noah born? 1056    (Biblical counting that is. Not real years.)

And 10560 is 2 x 5280.  Which is easily recognized!  No? How many feet are in a mile?

We are led on a further quest…..Who designated the feet in a mile? Who designed the alphabet? What is the meaning of 56?

I let this whole matter rest for consideration before the Sator Rotas is examined further.

Thanks for reading. Feel free to leave a question or a comment.

More on the Hebrew Alphabet and secrets

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