In the Indo-European Language: Letters Hold the Power

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

In the last posts ea, b, g; d, h, wf; z, ch, t; i, k, L; m, n and s were studied. In this post A, p, and ts are examined.

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They represent numbers 70, 80 and 90 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image below.

It is suggested the ‘long A’ sound represents the number seventy. This number is of importance when measuring longitude. The distance between each degree is 69.2 miles at the equator. From the pole down it creates a wedge shape which is reflected in both the Latin and Hebrew letter form. Notably in Anglo-Saxon ae meant law, custom.

Consider that it suggests the idea: assigned, custom, law.

The next letter ‘p’ has value 80. We find it used in such common words as point, place, plane and power.

Consider it suggests the idea: power in the small or great.

The next letter provides the sound ‘ts’. It has value 90. Numerically this is an important number. The pole lies at 90 degrees and this is the place where the story of Baal plays out. The comet struck here at the tessarace. (A tessarace is the summit of a tetrahedron or four-sided figure with top and bottom like the Great Pyramid.)

Consider that it suggests the idea: to harm by tossing, teasing, twisting, action that harms.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

At = at, awa = world without end, aetys = present, attest, al = fire, burning;

pa = father, pohha = pocket, pawa = peacock;

teosu = harm, injure, tosaw = strew, scatter.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order. Continuing where we left off:

s-A or seg = say, story;

A-p or apa = repeat, manifest;

p-ts or put-toss.

Before we had these significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, ‘g’ action, rotation, ‘d’ a division or state,‘h’ on high, ‘wf’ ongoing, ‘z’ to sever, severeness, ‘ch’ to change, ‘t’ a place of union, linear action, ‘I’ the eye or center, ‘k’ the impact crater and its properties, ‘L’ to lie where it fell, to lay out, to be in a line, ‘m’ more, might, measure of, ‘n’ negation, to reverse in direction yet continue, and ‘s’ continuous state of being, unbroken. Each is represented by a short sound.

Now we have these ideas: ‘A’ assigned, custom law, ‘p’ power in the small or great, and ‘ts’ to harm by tossing, teasing, twisting, action that harms.

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The Indo-European Language: More Numbers and Ideas

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

In the last posts ea, b, g; d, h, wf; z, ch, t; I, k and L were studied. In this post m, n and s are examined.

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They represent numbers 40, 50 and 60 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image below. Now the Hebrew script shows it has something in common with other alphabets such as Latin, Greek and Cyrillic. The letter order of k, l, m, n is consistent in all of these alphabets.

The ‘m’ sound represents the number forty. Biblically this is an important number. The flood lasted 40 days and nights. Moses wandered in the wilderness for 40 years etc. Consider that a square of sides of 40 has a diameter of 56.56 and this is that all important number that only the initiates could see. It conceals the most important measure. Note that the word measure is two words ma and sure. The first means more and the latter suggests we will be sure of it if we measure.

Consider that it suggests the idea: more, might, measure of.

The next letter ‘n’ has value 50. It too has unique properties. It suggests halves as in 50-50. Its original letter form was a down, up, down stroke similar to the modern form with the up then down. The letter suggests it is something that reverses.

Consider it suggests the idea: negation, to reverse in direction yet continue. We find it used in such common words as no, negate, next and nigh.

The next letter provides the sound ‘s’. It has value 60. Like its counterpart 6, it suggests time. In this case time is measured in increments of 60 seconds and minutes. The form of the Hebrew letter is a circle and circles suggest ongoing cycles.

Consider that it suggests the idea: continuous state of being, unbroken.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

ma = more, maeg = may, male kinsman, mah = evil;

ne = no, not equal, nag = not to own, neah = almost, lately, finally;

sae = sea, se = thus, seow = sew, bring to fruition.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order. Continuing where we left off:

l-m or lama = cripple, lay;

m-n or man = mankind, force, troop;

n-s or nes = escape, survive.

Before we had these significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, ‘g’ action, rotation, ‘d’ a division or state,‘h’ on high, ‘wf’ ongoing, ‘z’ to sever, severeness, ‘ch’ to change, ‘t’ a place of union, linear action, ‘I’ the eye or center, ‘k’ the impact crater and its properties, and ‘L’ to lie where it fell, to lay out, to be in a line. Each is represented by a short sound.

Now we have these ideas: ‘m’ more, might, measure of, ‘n’ negation, to reverse in direction yet continue, and ‘s’ continuous state of being, unbroken.

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Ye Old Language of the Ancients

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” – FDR

All the words in this famous quote by President Roosevelt are Anglo-Saxon and could be understood by people speaking the language a thousand years ago or more.

Note these interesting little riddles made from Anglo-Saxon words. (If the meaning of the word has changed with time, the old meaning is in parentheses.)

Are these not rather descriptive sentences of a comet impact with the planet?

Tap tip top.

Pat put (out eyes) of pate (happy one) into pits and pots.

Mece (sword) and myce (more) make muck of meek.

It came and its cyme (aftermath) is a cumb (valley) and cama (collar).

Pin (torture) pun (poke hole through) into a pan (dish) and pen.

Tack (a nail) take and tuc (punish).

The hale hill was hele (concealed) into a hell.

This book is about the baking, bucking, bickering becca (pike) on the back from where it becks (streams).

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