Indo-European as a Language is Laid Out

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

In the last posts ea, b, g; d, h, wf; z, ch and t were studied. In this post I, k and L are examined.

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They represent numbers 10, 20 and 30 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image below. Now the numbers count out the tens.

It is suggested the ‘I’ or ‘y’ sound represents the number ten. Each time a number is multiplied by ten it moves one place to the left and a zero or place holder is added to the right if no other digit (1, 2, 3…) is used. Similarly, division by ten moves the number to the right. Essentially, this is the number all the other numbers are centered around.

Consider that it suggests the idea: the eye or center.

The next letter ‘K’ has value 20. It is twice 10. The double is important here. Recall that it has been suggested this language was invented to transmit the ideas of the Baalists. Central to this is the idea that two comets struck the planet simultaneously. That idea is embodied in this number. The Latin K takes the form of the Phoenician letter for ‘ea.’ Turn it on its side and the idea of a sharp object impacting with a surface is depicted. In the Hebrew forms we see perhaps a precipitous cliff and crater.

Consider it suggests the idea: the impact crater and its properties. We find it used in such common words as crater, cave, cause and collide.

The next letter provides the sound ‘L’. It has value 30. Thirty correlates well with the idea of measurement. Thirty feet is 360 inches. The circle is measured in 360 degrees. A double hour of longitude is 30 degrees etc.  All of which suggest the ordering of things. We find it in such common words as to lie, to lay, land and line.

Consider that it suggests the idea: to lie where it fell, to lay out, to be in a line.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

eage = eye, iu = geo, formerly, yb = ymbe = around, at, upon;

caeg = key, essence, caeg = object or place, ceahhe = dawn;

lea = piece of ground, lieg = to lie, at rest, leg = lieg = flame.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order. Continuing where we left off:

t-i or tieg = to tie, bind;

i-k or iec = increase;

k-l or cyll = skin, kill.

Before we had these significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, ‘g’ action, rotation, ‘d’ a division or state,‘h’ on high, ‘wf’ ongoing, ‘z’ to sever, severeness, ‘ch’ to change, and ‘t’ a place of union, linear action. Each is represented by a short sound.

Now we have these ideas: ‘I’ the eye or center, ‘k’ the impact crater and its properties, and ‘L’ to lie where it fell, to lay out, to be in a line.

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The Indo-European Language at its Earliest

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

In the last posts ea, b, g ; d, h, wf were studied. In this post z, ch and t are examined.

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They represent numbers 7, 8 and 9 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image below.

The ‘z’ sound represents the number seven. It separates the days into weeks. It was used historically in other ways such as the jubilee which was the fiftieth year following 7 x 7 years.

Consider that it suggests the idea: to sever and severeness.

The next letter ‘ch’ has value 8. Numerically it can be associated with 2 x 2 x 2,

or 2 + 2 + 2 + 2, or a number which grows incrementally.

Consider it suggests the idea: to change. We find it used in such common words as chatter, chemistry and chew.

The next letter ‘t’ has value 9. It is the last number before 10 and in base 10 (the system we use) it is the highest digit before the numbers repeat again. It is a stopping point, a tie, not a division as in ‘d’.

Consider that it suggests the idea: a place of union, linear action.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

sa = bucket, sig = to sink (sun), syfre = sober;

cheow = to chew; che = change, shift, cine = chine, fissure;

tieg = tie, bind, ta = rod, spread, toe, tima = time.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in series as provided by the alphabet’s order. Continuing where we left off:

wf-z or fys = feeze, drive away

z-ch or secg = ‘sedge’, reed, sword, warrior

ch-t or ‘chette’ = chatter from raescettan = crackle, creak.

Before we had these significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, ‘g’ action, rotation, ‘d’ a division or state,‘h’ on high, and ‘wf’ ongoing. Each is represented by a short sound.

Now we have these ideas: ‘z’ to sever, severeness, ‘ch’ to change, and ‘t’ a place of union, linear action.

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The Indo-European Language Continues

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

In the last post ea, b, g were studied. In this post d, h, and wf are examined.

They represent numbers 4, 5 and 6 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image below.

Notice how the ‘d’ in Hebrew looks like a right angle. As number four it is the first number with a whole number even square root (2 x 2 = 4). Four is the number of sides of a square. It requires an abrupt change in direction to make a square, a 90 degree angle. A polygon is a closed figure. The letter’s forerunner in the Phoenician language was a triangle. The first possible polygon.

Consider that it suggests the idea: a complete division, a final state.

The next letter ‘h’ has value 5. Numerically it can be associated with the golden ratio or phi in this way: (√5 + 1) / 2. The golden ratio is related to growth and life.

Consider it suggests the idea: high, the heights.

It is suggested the sixth letter provides the sounds f, o, u and w. This was perhaps a single sound at one time such as foe. It has value 6. It is the first number whose inverse is infinite and presents an infinite series of 6.

1 / 6 = .1666666….

Consider that it suggests the idea: variation, a state of ongoing change or continuation, infinite.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

daeg = day, die = die, dead = dead;

hea = heah = high;

wea = woe, misfortune, fa = foe, hostile,

of = of, off, from, away.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order. We continue where we left off:

g-d or gad (wandering in lack)

d-h or dah = division, partial

h-wf or hu = how, hwy = why

Before we had these significant ideas: ‘a’ source,  ‘b’ to be bisected, ‘g’ action, rotation. Each is represented by a short sound.

Now we have these ideas: ‘d’ a division or state, ‘h’ on high, and ‘wf’ ongoing.

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The Abc’s of the Indo-European Language

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

It was suggested previously that the alphabet as preserved in the Hebrew Script represents the original Indo-European Language and that each letter represents a sound, number and idea.

We begin with the first three in this post: ea, b, g.

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

They represent numbers 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The Hebrew Letters are as seen in the image.

Begin with the first letter that looks like a capital N. As number one it has unique properties. It can create all other whole numbers and one divided by itself is one.

It is suggested it provided the “short a, short e and ea sounds.”

Consider that it suggests the idea: continuous source, beginning.

The second letter ‘b’ has value 2. Numerically it is unique as the first even number. It also has the ability to divide numbers into equal halves. And when two halves of any species come together a new creation is made. Hence, consider that it suggests the idea: in two, to be bisected, to be born, to exist.

The third letter is ‘g’. It is suggested it provides the sound ‘g both hard and soft versions’. As three it is unique in that it is the first digit in pi  = 3.1415 or the ratio between the circumference of a circle and its diameter.

Consider that it suggests the idea: action in a circular manner, rotation, coming together, to gyrate, yaw and in agreement as we see in yes.

From Anglo-Saxon note these examples using these letters:

ea = stream, source, aege = awe, eall = all;

bi- = two, be = to be, bu = dwelling;

gay = yaw, ge = yes, ga = to go, ge = an expression of emphasis.

Note the meaning of the words as they are found in the series as provided by the alphabet’s order:

ea-b or aeb = ebb;

b-g or beg = to do, care for, used today in the phrase “that is very big of you”;

Thus far we have three significant ideas: ‘a’ source, ‘b’ to be bisected, and ‘g’ action, rotation. Each is represented by a short sound.

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Ye Old Language of the Ancients

© 2019 B. L. Freeborn

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” – FDR

All the words in this famous quote by President Roosevelt are Anglo-Saxon and could be understood by people speaking the language a thousand years ago or more.

Note these interesting little riddles made from Anglo-Saxon words. (If the meaning of the word has changed with time, the old meaning is in parentheses.)

Are these not rather descriptive sentences of a comet impact with the planet?

Tap tip top.

Pat put (out eyes) of pate (happy one) into pits and pots.

Mece (sword) and myce (more) make muck of meek.

It came and its cyme (aftermath) is a cumb (valley) and cama (collar).

Pin (torture) pun (poke hole through) into a pan (dish) and pen.

Tack (a nail) take and tuc (punish).

The hale hill was hele (concealed) into a hell.

This book is about the baking, bucking, bickering becca (pike) on the back from where it becks (streams).

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What Strange Secret Lies Hidden Here?

Elephant Tablet found during construction of Cuenca Airport, Ecuador

Elephant Tablet found during construction of Cuenca Airport, Ecuador

© 2018 B. L. Freeborn

In prior posts the idea that ancient art describes the events of a great comet impact and an associated crustal displacement was discussed. Support from ancient records then turned to the written word and in particular to the Hebrew alphabet as a method for reconstructing the Indo-European Language.

The Hebrew Alphabet was discussed in these posts previously under the title “A Little Mystery Hidden in the Hebrew Alphabet.”

There are two things that are distinct about the Hebrew alphabet. Five of the twenty-two letters are associated with a pair called an end-cap because they are used at the end of Hebrew words. This makes a total of twenty-seven symbols. Secondly, the alphabet is called an abjed which means it has no vowels.

Additionally, each letter is also a number. The numbers associated with them are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 , 80, 90, 100, 200, 300 and 400. Some numbering schemes assign the higher numbers 500 etc. to the end cap letters.

The letters will be replaced by the Latin letters shown in the image for font convenience sake:

Key to the Hebrew Letters and the Latin Letter that will serve to substitute for it in this study due to font issues.

Imagine that all texts were originally written on clay tablets (or worse yet carved in stone) and someone had to collect the clay, make the tablets, write the tablets, bake the tablets and pity the poor soul who had to haul them from place to place. It is easy to conclude lengthy documents required great economy of lettering to facilitate this process and minimize the massive bulk.

With this in mind, in this reconstruction of the Indo-European language, each letter becomes an entire word or more precisely an idea. In contrast to tradition the ‘ea’, the first letter, will be taken to be a short ‘a’ or short ‘e.’ The letter Ayin, marked ‘A’, will be the long ‘a’ of English. The ‘I’ will be  a long ‘I’ or ‘Y’ and the ‘wf’ will be the four Latin letters: O, U, F and W. The multi-purpose ‘wf’ was either used to confuse the novice or was originally some word/sound forgotten with time but probably along the line of wouf or fouw. It is often associated with the sound ‘v’ as well which provides 5 sounds for the 6th letter and recreates the 5-6 noted in prior posts as being important. However, this study shows that over time the B took on the role for the ‘V’ sound of ‘wf’.

Also, contrary to custom each letter typically considered a consonant will automatically be assumed to be followed by a short ‘a’ or ‘e’ so that ‘b’ becomes ‘ba’ or ‘be,’ and ‘d’ becomes ‘da’ or ‘de’, etc.,  The difference between short ‘a’ and ‘e’ is of little importance since their actual pronunciation varies greatly with locality and time. In total contrast to the idea that this alphabet is vowel-less note this means there are certainly four ‘vowels’ depicted by symbols and one assumed to be present if one of the other four is not used.

These assumptions convert the Hebrew abjed alphabet to one with consonants and vowels much more like the modern Latin alphabet. The beauty of this is it removes the necessity of writing every ‘e’ which is still the most common letter used today and thereby substantially reduces the weight of each document written in clay. This is a worthy goal for book maker and reader alike.

Very soon we begin slowly defining the words associated with the individual letters to arrive at the twenty-two basic words/concepts of the Indo-European Language. After that many two and three letter words will be explored which will notably expand the vocabulary before some interesting ancient words are examined.

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